Supporting a person with narcolepsy

Many ways to help

If you know someone who has narcolepsy, for instance if you are a parent or other family member or friend, or a colleague or employer, there are many ways in which you can support that person and help them deal with the effects of their condition.

Learn and understand

First, by learning what narcolepsy is, what the symptoms are, and the ways that the condition is treated and managed, you will gain a greater understanding of that person's needs.

As a parent, for instance, you will soon appreciate not only the direct effects that narcolepsy has, as a result of symptoms such as excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, but also the indirect effects on mental and emotional well-being that can result from the diagnosis of such a debilitating lifelong condition.

Teachers can make a difference

If you are involved in the education of a person with narcolepsy, please visit our Narcolepsy and Education page to read our suggestions for helping to enable a student with narcolepsy to realise their full potential, and to download our guides to Narcolepsy and Education and our Narcolepsy Guide for Teachers.

Support at work is critical

Similarly, if you have a colleague or employee with narcolepsy, please visit our Narcolepsy and Work page to learn how you can help that person be a productive member of your team, and to download our guides to Narcolepsy and Work and our Narcolepsy Guide for Employers.