university

node taxonomy

#NarcolepsyStories: Lee Martin

Blog post
6 October 2020

Sleep is as vital as drinking water and people who sleep well simply cannot grasp just how devastating a sleep disorder like narcolepsy can be.

I've had narcolepsy for as long as I can remember. But I went undiagnosed for almost two decades. Then, in my 20s, I had a cataplexy attack for the first time, my muscles suddenly giving way during sex. This was one of the most frightening experiences of my life because I remained conscious but had no idea what was going on and thought I must be dying.

node taxonomy

#NarcolepsyStories: Nikita Tyler

Blog post
2 October 2020

I had turned 13 and over the summer holidays, I began sleeping in until the afternoon and taking naps for the rest of the day. I put it down to feeling a bit depressed because my best friend at the time had moved away. My mum put it down to me being a lazy teenager. By the time I went back to school in September, the urge to sleep was becoming more frequent and more intense. I remember my eyes starting to sting in a religious studies lesson and I just wanted to shut them. At home, after school, I’d sit down and be asleep at exactly the same moment.

node taxonomy

#NarcolepsyStories: Heather Murphy

Blog post
9 October 2020

One day I was a child who could get up at 6am and stay awake until late in the evening. The next I just couldn’t stay awake. About a year on, I experienced cataplexy quite suddenly. It was not gradual like the tiredness. I would collapse whenever I laughed or even just with the joy of seeing friends.

If a child came to you with seizure-like symptoms wouldn’t you take them a little more seriously?

node taxonomy

#NarcolepsyStories: April Atkin

Blog post
18 September 2020

When I was at school, particularly in sixth form, I would take a nap everyday after school. I would really struggle to stay awake all day and would usually fall asleep in the car or on the bus on the way home. I always felt fatigued, something I and others often put down to ‘hormones’, staying up too late or my vegetarian diet. My sleepiness became my ’thing’, a defining feature. There are countless times when I fell asleep by accident when alone and I would wake several hours later.

node taxonomy

#NarcolepsyStories: Megan Wall

Blog post
15 September 2020

Nobody knew what was happening to me. I started to experience an array of symptoms such as excessive daytime sleepiness, frequent loss of muscle control in my legs, arms and neck as well as slurred speech. I visited hospitals all over the country seeing different specialists, including a thyroid specialist, an ME specialist and several sleep disorder specialists, with myasthenia gravis even being investigated. Eventually, eighteen months after the onset of symptoms, I was diagnosed with narcolepsy and cataplexy at the severe end of the spectrum.

node taxonomy

#NarcolepsyStories: Liam Gordon

Blog post
11 September 2020

When walking home after a full day at university, I began to notice my knees buckle for a split second and there was nothing I could do. In that moment, it felt as if my whole body was about to give way; then the next thing I knew I was completely fine. I had just started my fourth year studying chemical and process engineering, the workload was high and beginning to get the better of me. At home, I might try to watch a film, but would be overwhelmed by a need to sleep and be unconscious within the first five minutes.

Subscribe to university